Walead Beshty at the Barbican

 

London-born, Los Angeles based artist Walead Beshty has been commissioned by the Barbican to transform The Curve into a show-stopping installation by covering its walls with more than 12,000 cyanotype prints.

 

Each piece of A Partial Disassembling of an Invention Without a Future: Helter-Skelter and Random Notes in Which the Pulleys and Cogwheels Are Lying Around at Random All Over the Workbench was created by using objects from Beshty’s studio, placing them on UV sensitive surfaces and exposing them to light, creating a sea of blues – ranging from cyan to indigo and navy.

 

Each piece is unique due to the unpredictability of sunlight, the surface used and the amount of UV sensitive emulsion applied. Combined with the mix of clearly recognizable everyday objects, mysterious shapes and the distinct intensity of a cyanotype’s blue, the installation merges with the simplistic shape of The Curve.

 

A must-see for lovers of Man Ray’s Rayographs, admirers of unusual creative techniques and those who are drawn to all things blue. 

 

Walead Beshty at the Barbican

 

Walead Beshty at the Barbican

 

Walead Beshty at the Barbican

 

Walead Beshty at the Barbican

 

Walead Beshty at the Barbican

 

Walead Beshty

A Partial Disassembling of an Invention Without a Future: Helter-Skelter and Random Notes in Which the Pulleys and Cogwheels Are Lying Around at Random All Over the Workbench

 

The Curve, Barbican Centre, London UK

9 October 2014 – 8 February 2015

 

www.barbican.org.uk

Shibori

 

Our shibori collection is a work of art; each hand dyed by one of the most talented and inspirational people we’ve ever met. Since you couldn’t all be in our masterclasses, here’s a brief history of this ancient art. 

 

Shibori is an ancient cloth dying technique originating in 8th century Japan, though ancient artefacts are now being found across Africa, India and South America. In 700 AD silk was outlawed in Japan for everyone but the emperor, and so his subjects wore cotton, embellished for special occasions with readily available natural indigo dye (which eventually became known as the dye of the people).

 

The Art of Shibori

 

From humble roots has grown a rare art form, including some of the most beautiful kimonos the world has ever seen – the most special of which took, and still take, several shibori experts working together an entire year to complete. In these instances, they use an incredibly skilled and painstaking process where lightweight silk is tightly wrapped in tiny sections and secured with even tinier stitches. The fabric is then immersed in huge pots of indigo dye and once dried, thousands of these tiny stitches are carefully undone to reveal the bespoke pattern which remains where the fabric has resisted the indigo. For everyday garments, without the $50,000 price tag, shibori patterns are created by twisting, knotting, stitching and tying the fabric to create resists before immersing the fabric.

 

MiH Jeans x Niki Livingston Shibori Collection

 

 

 

An in-depth study of shibori is the unveiling of a social and cultural history (just spend 5 minutes with Niki and you’ll be entranced) - here’s some recommended reading here, here and here if we’ve caught your fancy.

 

 

Indigo: Egyptian Mummies to Blue Jeans

Adire cloth in Nigeria: The preparation and dyeing of indigo patterned cloths among the Yoruba

Indigo: The Colour that Changed the World


top image from here

27/03/2014

Do you love our watermelon print as much as we do? Have a slice of the action with our downloadable wallpapers for your PC, tablet and mobile desktop. Thanks to the lovely Bernadette Pascua for the beautiful illustration! 

 

Download for the watermelon wallpaper for PC and Laptops


Download for tablets


Download for phones

 

MiH Jeans Watermelon Wallpaper

 

08/02/2013

 

Since seeing the Bandana print in our Pre SS13 collection we have gradually become more and more obsessed with it at MiH HQ. 

The bandana print was inspired by a vintage indigo textile and then recreated as this pattern, above, by New York illustrator Bernadette Pascua. Name sound familiar? That is because in 2011 Bernadette sent us a lovely illustration she had drawn from a behind-the-scenes photograph of our Spring-Summer 2012 look book shoot, captured by the incredibly talented Vanessa Jackman.

The end result is the understated print in our tails shirt, silk top and Breathless jean

09/06/2011

Our latest pre collection has just launched on the MiH e-shop and we can honestly say we have never been so excited at the prospect of Autumn or Winter.  It’s hard to decide which piece we NEED more; the adorable Bowtie Shirt in Indigo Ditsy or the effortlessly cool Decade Skirt. We have managed to pry a few top secret images from Chloe’s moodboard to help you get as excited as we are.


Contact us:

UK Online Store (Worldwide except the US)

theteam@mih-jeans.com
Tel: +44 (0) 207 351 7000


US Online Store

usteam@mih-jeans.com
Tel: +1 646 374 1731


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